Testy Copy Editors

Our new website is up and running at testycopyeditors.org. This board will be maintained as an archive. Please visit the new site and register. Direct questions to the proprietor, blanp@testycopyeditors.org
It is currently Fri Apr 16, 2021 6:55 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Employer goes phishing
PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 10:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 06, 2005 8:31 pm
Posts: 552
Location: Pennsylvania
From journalismjobs.com:

Quote:
If currently or previously employed on a full-time basis, applicants must include compensation information (salary + bonus + benefits) in order to be considered.


The one change I would love to see in job hunting is the end of these sorts of requests. I wish employers weren't allowed to ask about the applicant's salary unless they had already disclosed what they were willing to pay the applicant.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Employer goes phishing
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 2008 7:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 02, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 119
Location: Small Town, Pa.
longwords wrote:
I wish employers weren't allowed to ask about the applicant's salary ...


This came up recently on another board I patronize for another professional field. Consensus answers included that although employers are allowed to ask, you're not required to answer. (Although many acknowledged that the refusal might set an unpleasant tone in an interview, or result in not even getting an interview.)
Many in that discussion said they leave those requests blank and politely refuse to discuss it.

Best quote from one poster may have been, "With respect, I'm not applying for my previous job. I'd like to work for you, and here's what I think my skills are worth. May we talk about that now?"

Poster claimed that it can work if applied with the right amount of politeness and deference.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Employer goes phishing
PostPosted: Fri Aug 01, 2008 9:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:16 am
Posts: 190
Location: Canada, eh?
JT wrote:
Best quote from one poster may have been, "With respect, I'm not applying for my previous job. I'd like to work for you, and here's what I think my skills are worth. May we talk about that now?"

Poster claimed that it can work if applied with the right amount of politeness and deference.


I agree with poster. This approach has worked for me through my last three jobs (two dailies and a small magazine) and a stint as a freelancer.

I have left that info blank and secured job interviews on the strength of my resume. Before the interview, I have done enough research to determine the likely pay range, so I know my bargaining limits. At the interview, I have said 'Look, let's be honest. Here's what I believe I'm worth, and it's a reasonable amount of compensation and it will allow me to pay my bills. That's fair to both parties.'

In one interview, the ME actually said he didn't think I would want the job being advertised, because they were looking for an entry-level person with pay to match. I said thanks and we parted, at least appreciating each other's honesty. And as a freelancer, only one potential client turned me down because of high rates, and it was an ad agency that admitted its client would not pay anything above minimum wage. Fair enough. Still, the agency did hire me on two other projects, when it had better clients.

It's not a question of whether a potential employer should be "allowed" to ask the question. The issue is how you answer. Solution? Know what you're worth, be prepared to argue it from a position of strength, and be prepared to walk away from low-paying crappy jobs.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 12, 2006 11:48 am
Posts: 523
Location: Charlestown, RI
I think a reasonable amount of candor on both sides saves time and trouble all around. While I wouldn't insist on knowing someone's complete salary history just to interview them, I don't interview anyone who isn't willing to state their salary *expectations* up front, because I don't have time to waste interviewing people who expect to make more than I do. (Of course, if someone asks for too little, that tells you something as well.) "But just because someone asks for more money doesn't mean they won't accept a lower salary," you might be thinking. True, but the person who accepts a lower salary isn't likely to stick around long either. So all in all, I don't think I'd want to hire anyone without at least knowing what they earned at their most recent job.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 12:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2002 1:01 am
Posts: 8342
Location: Bethesda, Md.
Late in the process, if I am asked how much I earned at my last job, I will give the figure and add, "I would expect to make more." That leaves it pretty open.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Forum locked This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

What They're Saying




Useful Links